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Meet the Docs: Ft. Dr. Max Madhere


It's officially the first week of our ‘Meet the Docs’ campaign. This week we are proud to introduce Dr. Max Madhere, Cardiothoracic Anesthesiologist & founder of Pulse of Perseverance.


Dr. Maxime (pronounced Maxim) Madhere is originally from Brooklyn N.Y. and raised in Washington DC. He is a double-board certified cardiac anesthesiologist who has earned his Diplomate status from both the American Board of Anesthesiology and the National Board of Echocardiography.


After receiving his bachelor's degree in Biology Pre-Med with honors from Xavier University in 2002, he then received his medical degree from Howard University College of Medicine in 2008, where he gained a passion for treating critically ill patients in acute settings. This led him to the field of Anesthesiology, where he completed his residency training at Henry Ford Hospital, a level-one trauma center located in Detroit, Michigan. He went on to pursue a fellowship in Cardiothoracic Anesthesia, also obtained at Henry Ford Hospital, where he learned the unique skill set of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography, intraoperative management of patients undergoing valvular repair (open surgical and trans valvular technique), aortic dissection repair, heart/lung transplantation, and coronary artery bypass grafting.


Dr. Madhere has been in private practice since 2013, and is a partner/shareholder in his group. He is the current Director Of Cardiac Anesthesia at Our Lady of Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where he resides with his wife and 3 children.


Shortly after moving to Baton Rouge, Dr. Madhere noticed the large socioeconomic and educational gaps between privileged white communities and minority communities. This inspired him to write a book that he recently co-authored with 2 of his best friends entitled “Pulse of Perseverance: 3 black doctors on their journey to success”. The book is an honest, deeply personal tale about three young black men’s refusal to succumb to failure, and how, together, they overcame daunting odds to take their place among the just five percent of US doctors who are black. The book and the group’s mission has received national attention from the TODAY Show, Steve Harvey, ABC World News, Associated Press, Ebony, Black Enterprise Magazine, Blackdoctor.org, and social media giant “TheShadeRoom”. Nikole Hannah Jones, author of “The 1619 Project” wrote “This book is the North Star for every black child who sees something greater for himself than the world would have him believe”.


Dr Madhere has personally received the highest honors from his alma mater, Xavier University of Louisiana, where he was awarded “Doctor of Humane Letters” during his commencement address to the 2019 graduating class, as well as the “40 under 40” award.

He is an active mentor and executive board member of 100 Black Men of Metro Baton Rouge, where he was honored as the 2017 “Member of the year”. In 2018 he received the ‘Young Doctors DC Service Award’ for his role in changing the narrative of black men in medicine. Most recently, he was honored by the LSU Department Of Anesthesiology as Outstanding Faculty of The Year for the second consecutive year (2021 and 2022).


Through his work at Pulse of Perseverance, Dr Madhere wants to continue to execute the mission of the organization, which is to “give young black children the blueprint and the resources for success”. He truly believes that the P3 app is the key to creating the ecosystem that will allow young people to fulfill both their academic and professional potential.


Dr. Madhere attributes much of his success to strong male mentorship during his formative years. They include, but are not limited to, the following: accountability for one’s own actions, respect for self and others, humility, and perseverance in the face of doubt. His favorite quote is “not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced” by James Baldwin. He wants to continue that legacy of strong male mentorship by working to change the narrative surrounding young black men.


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